Job Posting: Senior Staff Administrative Assistant

Job Posting: Senior Staff Administrative Assistant

Official Job Description for Senior Staff Administrative Assistant: (15 hours)

Duties:

  • Provides administrative support to Senior Staff.
  • Organization of files and resources.
  • Coordinates scheduling needs for trainings and
  • Organizes, publicizes and sets up for meetings, groups and events.
  • Development of Resource Email for clinicians.
  • Creates and maintains filing systems, both electronic and physical.
  • Prepares records requests.
  • Manages EHR permissions and updates.
  • Assists with Compassionate Care events.
  • Tracking of liability insurance and license renewal.
  • Onboarding responsibilities for Post Masters Volunteers, Contractors and Staff.
  • Special projects or other duties as assigned by Clinical Director.
  • Supervised by Clinical Director.

Administrative Assistant Skills and Qualifications:

  • Excellent Verbal Communication
  • Reporting Skills
  • Administrative Writing Skills
  • Microsoft Office Skills – Word, Excel, Outlook etc.
  • Organization
  • Professionalism
  • Problem Solving
  • Ability to take direction from multiple staff members

Education and Experience Requirements:

  • High School diploma or equivalent education required
  • 3 years of administrative assistant experience
  • Knowledge of appropriate software including: Microsoft Word, Excel, Outlook, Microsoft PowerPoint and Adobe Acrobat.

Terms of Employment:

  • Hours of employment: 10 – 15 hours per week
  • Part-time hourly employee status including PTO, Perks, and Continuing Education
  • Payment will be dispersed on the 15th and 30th of each month
  • Notice of 2 weeks required to terminate employment
  • Must submit to a TBI Background Check.

Those interested in applying may send their cover letter and resume to Anita Pringle at anita.pringle@therefugecenter.org

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“Handcrafted” Transitions

“Handcrafted” Transitions

"What if the transition that you are in right now is being handcrafted?"

Transition. What a scary word, especially when you didn’t ask for the change to happen. 

 

Several years ago, we were remodeling a room in our home to become our new kitchen. Unfortunately, due to the age of the house, the new kitchen floor was uneven with the existing floor.  

 

Every time I checked the progress, I would become concerned over the flooring not being perfectly even. However, the carpenter continually assured me that he would take care of us. 

 

After the project was complete, he finally added a transition piece to the floor that he handcrafted. This transition piece made what was previously ugly, clunky, and even dangerous seem to come together like a sewn-together garment. The addition to the floor invited you into the new kitchen.

 

What if the transition that you are in right now is being handcrafted? What if the transition you didn’t expect is taking you into a new room, a new world? This world is in a transition, but what if we shift our perspective and trust The Carpenter to handcraft this moment so that we can experience something new and promising? 

 

I’m believing with you. 

 If you would like additional support in transitions, we are here to help. Please contact The Refuge Center for Counseling at 615-591-5262 today.

Blog written by The Refuge Center Master’s Level Intern – Matt Wade

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Tommy the Turtle: A Story About Anxiety in Children

Tommy the Turtle: A Story About Anxiety in Children

"Wherever you are, you are not alone in the Pond of Life; there is always someone around who cares and can help."

Tommy the Turtle

Once upon a time, there lived a young turtle by the name of Tommy. Tommy had recently moved from Oceanland to Pond City with his family. He left his friends behind. He left his favorite coral reef behind. Even his favorite teacher Ms. Tentacles. He felt alone, when he was not talking with his parents or his sister. Whenever he would feel alone and scared, he would turtle into his shell.

His mom got so worried about him, when he went into his shell for days, and she decided to take him to see their local doctor, Dr. Panda the Pediatrician, who diagnosed him with Turtle Shell Syndrome.

Tommy was confused; he had never heard of such a disease before. Although he had stayed in his shell for the entire appointment, he decided to peek his head out to ask Dr. Panda what it meant to have Turtle Shell Syndrome. Dr. Panda responded, “It’s when you get scared or worried that you go into your shell. Some of the symptoms you may experience include: tummy ache, headache, sleeping too much or not sleeping enough, being grouchy or snappy with the people around you, feeling your muscles tingle or tense up, or feeling a lump in your throat.”

Tommy’s eyes grew; he couldn’t believe how Dr. Panda knew all the symptoms he was having.

“Well, how do I get better?” Tommy asked, halfway into his shell already and clinging to his mom’s hand for dear life.

Tommy told Dr. Panda how he was having a really hard time at school, staying in his shell or at the shore of the pond, when his classmates were everywhere, talking to each other and having fun. He felt all alone in his shell and on the shore. He wanted to hang out with his classmates and he wanted to be friends with them. He missed his friends from back home in Oceanland, but he knew that, no matter how badly he wanted to, he could not take them with him to Pond City.

“I do have one cool classmate here in Pond City who goes to school with me and hangs out with me at the shore. Her name is Sally and she’s a squid so she doesn’t have a shell; she usually walks up to where I am on the shore, says hello, and hangs out collecting seashells,” Tommy tells Dr. Panda, “Every time she asks me to join our classmates in the pond, I always go back in my shell and refuse to go anywhere.”

Mom patted Tommy’s shell, “I know it’s hard, baby, this move was not easy on any of us and especially on you.” Tommy felt heard and understood by Mom. “I wonder if it would help to take one step closer to the pond every day. We don’t have to go the whole way on the first day, but we can try, one step at a time.”

Dr. Panda smiled fondly, “One step a day will keep the doctor away!” Tommy giggled. “Okay, I will ask my friend if she can help me take one step each day. One day, I will reach the pond and ask my classmates if I can play with them,” Tommy shared.

Moral: Tommy struggled with anxiety, being the new kid in a new city and a new school, knowing no one. Many of us wrestle with anxiety – at work, at school, at church, in life. It took someone who cared and noticed Tommy’s shelly behavior to seek help and to listen to him as he talked about his struggle with anxiety. Tommy was, then, able to reach out to a friend and take one positive step each day. And we can too. Look at the people in your life, find someone you trust to ask help you take the first step in talking about anxiety. Wherever you are, you are not alone in the Pond of Life; there is always someone around who cares and can help. When you are ready, take the first step.

Thank you for taking the time to read this story. If you would like additional support, we are here to help. Please contact The Refuge Center for Counseling at 615-591-5262 today.

Blog written by The Refuge Center Child & Teen Team – Merna ElSols

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Job Posting: Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner

Job Posting: Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner

Requirements

– Master’s of Science in Nursing with a certification in Psychiatric Nursing (PMHNP-BC)
-Active license through state of TN (both RN and APN)
-ANCC/Board Certified
-Obtain/manage a supervising physician relationship per TN code annotated
-Maintain malpractice insurance

Clinical

-Maintain weekly clinical hours

-Submit monthly client statistics by the 3rd of each month

-Facilitate group supervision for interns within rotation

-Provide orientation to medication management program to new interns each semester

-Participate in continuing education opportunities

-Maintain ethical documentation

-Consult on cases for all clinical staff as needed

-Provide medication management to referred clients

-Maintain all supervision requirements

-Manage refills, client needs, and call backs on weekly basis or PRN

-Maintain onsite hours at Refuge for 32-40 hours per week.

Community/Collaboration

-Provide community mental health trainings as needed

-Represent Refuge Center at Refuge events (Annual Conference, Fundraising Dinner etc.)

Administrative

-Maintain paperwork and submission of grant data annually
-Maintain administrative work for managing practice within Refuge

-Obtain all needed supplies (prescription pads, genetic testing materials, lab needs, etc.)

-Attend quarterly meeting with Clinical Director

-Attend weekly staff meetings

Those interested in applying may send their cover letter and resume to Anita Pringle at anita.pringle@therefugecenter.org

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A Return to the Present

A Return to the Present

“Nothing is more precious than being in the present moment. Fully alive, fully aware” – Thich Nhat Hanh

In our busy lives with our hectic schedules trying to balance everything from work, family, relationships, we often get so swept up in everything that we don’t stop to actually be there for it.  Our minds are always elsewhere, anticipating what we have to do next.  Whether that’s rushing to the next meeting, picking up the kids, or thinking about what meal we are going to have next.  There’s always something to worry about and think about in the future.  This way of living is not all bad.  We have real concerns and things that we need to attend to everyday in our lives, and these can require thorough consideration.  However, it can feel like life is constantly going and almost out of our grasp.

I invite you to take a few moments each day to bring yourself into the present and out of the future.  This can be at the beginning of your day, sitting to eat breakfast, before or after lunch, in the afternoon when you may be feeling sleepy, in the evening, or anytime when you feel like you’re getting carried away by the day.

In these moments, take a few long deep breaths into your belly.  Feeling the sensations as the breath moves through the body and expands into your belly and then as it moves out and the belly falls.  Then take a look around and become aware of the objects around you, their colors, their shapes, their textures. Then start noticing the sounds you’re hearing around you. Finally, notice the sensations you might be feeling, like the weight of your body in your chair.

Taking these short moments each day can help us to take a moment to ourselves, where we aren’t rushing to the next thing, and have the space to just be.  They can be refreshing, relaxing, peaceful, and even joyful.  So next time, you find yourself rushing around, remember to take a moment to be here in the present.

If you need additional support, The Refuge Center is here to help! Feel free to contact us at 615-591-5262.

Blog written by The Refuge Center Former Master’s Level Intern – Matthew Maloney

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