Radical Loving Care for Caregivers: How self-care helps you care best for others

RefugeCenter_ConferencePoster_sponsors_WEBCaregivers of all kinds—from parents and spouses to therapists and other health care professionals—are notoriously bad at taking care of themselves. Oftentimes, we’re so caught up with caring for others, we may feel we do not “deserve” much time for ourselves.

The truth is that burned out caregivers cannot provide good care to anyone.

We were thrilled to host our fourth annual conference on Friday, April 17, 2015—“Radical Loving Care for Caregivers: How self-care helps you care best for others.” Attendees learned how they could reclaim their lives and refresh their energy so that they could offer their best self to themselves and others at this exciting event featuring renowned speaker, author, acclaimed healthcare leader and founder of the loving care movement, Eric Chapman.

The conference served as an opportunity for attendees to gain insight that will help them in their everyday lives while also supporting the mission of The Refuge Center for Counseling and the many clients it serves.

(Click here for pictures from the event.)
 

Thank you to our sponsors:

Next Version         Pinnacle   Rolling Hills Hospital.Horizontal Color Logo

efinancial           Peachtree Planning TN Logo (1) True EPS

New Blog Post: Rigorous Honesty

by Clint Hamm, Refuge Center Intern

“…a manner of living which demands rigorous honesty.” from chapter 5, Alcoholics Anonymous

“Then you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free.” John 8:32

If you’ve spent any length of time with 12-step/recovery literature or meetings, you’ve likely come across the phrase, “rigorous honesty.” It seems simple enough: tell the truth, right? But I would contend that the practice of this virtue is among the more  difficult things to master in this life. It’s about more than answering truthfully when asked a question, and it suggests a subtler dimension than don’t cheat or don’t lie. Of course, these are hard enough, but “rigorous honesty” when you get down below the surface a bit points to our need to tell the unflinching truth about ourselves the good and the bad. If I can’t be honest about my shortcomings, my mistakes, my dark tendencies and thoughts, or, equally, my hopes, dreams, and desires, I cannot
expect to make progress toward greater mental, emotional, relational, or spiritual health.

HonestThere’s just no way to move without the traction of a deeply honest and sincere introspection. I’ll be honest for a minute: I find myself again today at a decisive fork in the road. One path points in the direction of rigorous honesty and the other toward the all-too-familiar way of denial and repression. I’m trying really hard to walk the honest way, but honestly it hurts! It’s excruciating. Facing myself my fears is among the hardest things I’ll ever do. For all of us, there’s more to our story; there’s more truth to discover as we get further down beneath the surface, where our hearts and souls live. May we find the strength and the courage to make this inward journey diving deep down to our own depths to bravely face whatever we may find there. Because it will be worth it in the end.

For help along the way, consider The Refuge Center. Call us at (615) 5915262, or visit our website at http://therefugecente.wpengine.com/.

Rigorous Honesty

by Clint Hamm, Refuge Center Intern

“…a manner of living which demands rigorous honesty.” from chapter 5, Alcoholics Anonymous

“Then you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free.” John 8:32

HonestIf you’ve spent any length of time with 12-step/recovery literature or meetings, you’ve likely come across the phrase, “rigorous honesty.” It seems simple enough: tell the truth, right? But I would contend that the practice of this virtue is among the more  difficult things to master in this life. It’s about more than answering truthfully when asked a question, and it suggests a subtler dimension than don’t cheat or don’t lie. Of course, these are hard enough, but “rigorous honesty” when you get down below the surface a bit points to our need to tell the unflinching truth about ourselves the good and the bad. If I can’t be honest about my shortcomings, my mistakes, my dark tendencies and thoughts, or, equally, my hopes, dreams, and desires, I cannot
expect to make progress toward greater mental, emotional, relational, or spiritual health.

There’s just no way to move without the traction of a deeply honest and sincere introspection. I’ll be honest for a minute: I find myself again today at a decisive fork in the road. One path points in the direction of rigorous honesty and the other toward the all-too-familiar way of denial and repression. I’m trying really hard to walk the honest way, but honestly it hurts! It’s excruciating. Facing myself my fears is among the hardest things I’ll ever do. For all of us, there’s more to our story; there’s more truth to discover as we get further down beneath the surface, where our hearts and souls live. May we find the strength and the courage to make this inward journey diving deep down to our own depths to bravely face whatever we may find there. Because it will be worth it in the end.

For help along the way, consider The Refuge Center. Call us at (615) 5915262, or visit our website at http://therefugecente.wpengine.com/.